Malachi Krunch / Sold On Murder – Split

Completely random find. As I was parsing through the various Commodores and Jim Reeves albums at the local antique mall, suddenly this black and white, somewhat DIY-press-looking thing popped out at me. It was literally between a Poco record and a Christmas compilation. What the hell?

So, of course I start looking it over, trying to find some information on it. It’s a split album, one side per band. Malachi Krunch and Sold On Murder. The Malachi Krunch side has some text that implies their EP is titled American Realities along with a picture of two people in hats, glasses, handkerchief masks and holding guns. Its kind of intimidating.

Flipping it over shows the artwork for Sold On Murder’s side. A longhorn skull with a bunch of symbols behind it and what appears to be an interpolated gas mask is staring back at me. Alright, it’s time to hear what this stuff is like.

Side one; Malachi Krunch.

It’s fast. Its loud. Its hardcore. Yep, that’s kinda what I was expecting here. This isn’t music for a Sunday morning brunch. This is Saturday night, punch a cop, piss in a gutter, debauchery straight outta Connecticut.

Now for what I’ve been able to find. Malachi Krunch was the first band of New Haven, Connecticut punk Jim Martin. Jim would go on to front the band Broken, and later Chem-Trails. As I page through the insert a bit and read some of the lyrics, its clear to me that this band’s message is right up my alley. Cutouts of “STOP THE WAR ON THE POOR” and “Resist Amerikkan Genocide AND Drug War” are plastered betwixt lyric sheets. Yes! Song topics range from Puerto Rican revolt due to lack of representation, resistance, homelessness, pollution, and and ode to Dan Quayle’s wife Marilyn.

Jim’s still fronting hardcore crust acts today and leads the group Chem-Trails. Here he is performing with them in 2018.

Further digging yielded this basement performance recording of Malachi Krunch and Seizure in 1989. That’s Jim there with the long hair and sideburns, a completely different image from his more well-known shaved head aesthetic. His look matched the picture of him in the insert. I wonder if the pic was taken at this show?


Now for side two. Sold On Murder is muuuuch more difficult to find information about. I found this interview with Kris Keyes, a frontman for the band Dive Bomber in Los Angeles. He talks about how he first started painting himself in the music world while working with a band called Sold On Murder in New Haven, Connecticut. This checks out, too, because in the liner notes it thanks Kris Keyes for help on “Open Mind/Mind Decay” and “An Insanity Plea”.

According to a comment on this news story about a murder victim in New Haven in 2008, one of the members of Sold On Murder was, in fact…murdered. John Evers Robinson played bass and sang vocals for Sold On Murder, but was killed before the album was released. This was confirmed after I started looking through the inserts that came with the record.

One side of the lyric sheet is a memorial to John that also includes some pictures of Dan Quayle and his contradiction quotes. The lyrics are wild, in the sense that topics range from eating the world, drinking blood, sex, anti-capitalism, mental illness, and police brutality. Rad.

The music itself is hardcore. Fast, uptempo, brutal vocals, messy guitars, blazing solos. Its peak late 80s hardcore, like Bad Brains mixed with Living Colour (both of which are mentioned in the “thank yous”. This was absolutely worth the buy and a very fun trip into history. Its a real shame that John was murdered, the message behind his art is poignant 30 some years later. I’ll leave you with his quote from the insert.

Thanks for reading!

Heard To Find: The Dynettes – “Witness To A Heartbreak”

Artist: The Dynettes
Track: “Witness To A Heartbreak”
Release: New Guy / Witness To A Heartbreak (7″)
Year: 1965
Duration: 2:30

Maurice Williams scored a huge hit in 1960 when he and The Zodiacs put out the single “Stay”. At just 1:36 in length, the single would become the shortest song to ever reach #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 charts in the United States. After groups like The Hollies and The Four Seasons laid down their own versions of the song and pushed it into an international audience, Maurice & The Zodiacs would reap the benefits. Jackson Browne interpolated it into the finale of his 1978 masterpiece album Running On Empty as “The Load Out / Stay” which again brought the song to new audiences. It wasn’t until the song’s inclusion on the 1987 soundtrack to the film Dirty Dancing, though, that it would sell it’s highest amount of copies.

In 1965, Maurice wrote and arranged a pair of tracks for the girl group The Dynettes to record. I can’t seem to find much on The Dynettes individually, but as the record suggests the song was recorded in Chicago, Illinois around 1964 under the production of Bill “Bunky” Sheppard. According to the comments section of this Nerdtorious.com post, the lead singer’s name was Idella and she was last known to reside in Charlotte, North Carolina. That’s it. That’s all I can find, and that’s assuming the comment is legit.

As for the song itself, it bounces along like a lollipoppy, mid-60s soul jam with a nice, clean guitar chasing the messy drumbeat backed up by an organ and a call and response type vocal setting. It’s a shame this one didn’t make it further up the charts.

I’m sure the saturation of sixties girl groups made for a challenge for anyone to break through to fame, especially with the absolute domination from Phil Spector and his Wall of Sound groups.

The A-side, “New Guy” is another gem, this time with a more up-tempo approach. I love how the deep horns back up the girls’ vocals in start contrast. This song could easily be found on a movie montage or soundtrack. Something Summer-y.

The Constellation Records catalog has all kinds of hidden soul gems from 1964-65 and you can currently find the Constellation of Rhythm & Blues compilation on streaming services. Give it a dig sometime, these songs are the epitome of “lost treasures”. Instead of posting links to just the Dynettes’ music, here’s the full compilation.

The Little Red Rooster Band – Shufflin’, Hoppin’ and Fingerpoppin’ (Live At The Cabooze Bar In Minneapolis, MN)

Bought for a quarter in central Minnesota by my mother-in-law, this record’s artwork was enough to pique my interest. But then I see, “Minneapolis”!

On my last spin session, I discussed the work of Robert “One-Man” Johnson and his induction into the Central Iowa Blues Hall of Fame. Well, here’s another inductee!

The harmonica player on this album is Iowa legend Bobby Keith Dorr, or Bob Dorr as he’s known these days. Bob had quite the career in the music industry, first performing with local Iowa bands, then Little Red Rooster Band, then onto a long tenure with the Blue Band, all while maintaining a voice at Iowa Public Radio.

Something about this private pressing seems…better. It was issued by Crow For A Day Records in 1980; the sleeve is high quality cardboard and textured. Also, I’m going to have a soft spot for this record in my heart due to it being recorded at one of Minneapolis’ famous venue The Cabooze. I’d sometimes stop there after hanging out at legendary punk haunt The Triple Rock Social Club, as it was just under Highway 94 to get to the Cabooze.

This was recorded live in Minneapolis in 1979. All but two of the tracks on this album are blues standard covers. The originals are “Dance, Dance, Dance” , which is not a cover of the Steve Miller Band song, nor the Beach Boys’ song. The other original is “3 A.M. Back Door Lady” which can be heard below.

Whomever uploaded this video to YouTube mislabeled it as “Sweet Sadie”, the opposite side’s first track. Perhaps the labels on their record were reversed? Regardless, this original track is great! The harp playing from Bob gives the blues/funk crossover a perfect swagger and entrance for the rest of the song.

Its a shame the band didn’t put anything to studio, but this LP is a great addition to any collection for a blues harmonica/guitar fan. The musicianship is tight and unique, while the recording captures a room full of rowdy Midwesterners on the verge of an 80s digital music revolution. This keeps it simple. The covers are great, too. “Shake Your Moneymaker” blows the doors off the exits on a night even this sleepy dude wishes he was in attendance.

Thanks for reading!

One-Man Johnson – ’54 Chevrolet Panel Truck Blues

Just looking at this cover brings forth memories of a Northern Winter I’ve never experienced. It’s not that I haven’t experienced Winter in Minnesota or Wisconsin (I have, I live in MN), but the Winter pictured on this LP is clearly before my time.

The needle drops and resonator guitar sounds start bouncing through the speakers followed soon by a high-hat and some weird type of bass sounding thing. After turning the cover over, I start to unravel what it is I’m listening to.

I knew this would be a Midwestern artist just from the LP cover, which also features a Wisconsin license plate, but turning it over confirmed that suspicion. There isn’t a concrete description of where this was recorded, but two towns are listed after production credits; Chippewa Falls, WI and Cushing, MN. I’ll assume it was recorded at one of those towns and as the cover states it was recorded live with no overdubs.

That bass sounding thing is a 13 string acoustic foot piano; whatever the hell that is. I’m guessing Robert made it himself in order to give his one man band act depth. He simultaneously plays guitar, harmonica, kazoo, a high-hat cymbal, and the foot piano. Not bad, Bob!

The actual music is great. Resonator slide guitar blues, ragtime jingles, songs about pot, what’s there not to like? While the album is packed with catchy blues tunes, I have to imagine this act was more fun to watch live than listen to on record.

I don’t want to discredit any of the work put into this album, though. As simple as the recording may have been, that is what makes most recordings stand out. Overproduction ruins so many otherwise great songs, there’s just no need for it. A couple of mics and a mixer and we’ve got ourselves gold!

After scouring the internet for more information, I’ve learned that Robert recorded at least 10 albums over his career as a solo one man band. He was inducted into the Iowa Blues Hall of Fame in 2014, and below is a performance celebrating that in 2015.

One-Man Johnson is still active and plays live music, so I’m hopeful I’ll be able to catch a post-pandemic blues party at some point. Here’s a video of him performing in 2019 in Sutliff, Iowa. You can learn more about him at House Dog Music, his own record label used to release his albums.

Spotify has Robert One-Man Johnson’ ’54 Chevrolet Panel Truck Blues album available for streaming, check it out below.

Thanks for reading!

Kathy Dalton – Boogie Bands & One Night Stands

The album cover of this pressing reminds me of an old-timey diner, but that might be the ketchup-red lettering and mustard-yellow background. Of course, when you reprint something just to slap one extra song on it you might end up with something as basic as this. That being said, yeah I dig it.

The instrumentation grabs me right away in a familiar way, like an old Colorado sunset. Something about this sounds so familiar, yet I just can’t figure out why. I turned the sleeve over to peruse the back credits only to find that this repress doesn’t list them. Naturally, I head to Discogs to look for liner notes and musician credits. I found the original release, which was titled Amazing. Sure enough, there it is. As I read the picture of the back of the jacket I focus my eyes on a group whose (nearly) entire wax discography sits right there on my shelf. “Co-Starring” The Amazing Little Feat.

I’ve collected all of Little Feat’s Lowell George-era LPs, including Lowell’s solo effort Thanks I’ll Eat It Here. Something about his presence made this group better. The post-George days just don’t do it for me. Conversely, though, his daughter Inara is fairly well represented on my shelf with her ventures in The Bird And The Bee. Check her electropop group out sometime; great melodies and harmonies.

Back to Kathy. The new song, the title track, is probably my least liked song on the album. It is just a such boring track. I’m sorry Kathy. The rest of the album is much better though. If this started off with “Pour Your Wine”, it’d have taken off much more smoothly. “Gypsy Dancer” encompasses the title with a wailing yelp from Kathy during the intro. It almost sounds like Diva Plavalaguna, the blue opera singer from The Fifth Element. Paging: Chris Tucker.

“Cannibal Forest” shares that same moonlight wail lying in the background of the instrumentation. The chorus spouts “Danger/We’re lost in the cannibal forest/Stranger/Caught in the cannibal forest”. Those backup singers chanting “danger” every few bars provide an eerie backdrop for a fairly standard funk-ified tune. It also gives me slight reminiscence of “Danger! High Voltage!” by Electric Six. “Danger, danger!”

All in all, a decent album if you’re a fan of Little Feat. It was released by Discreet Records, Frank Zappa’s label. You might recall that Lowell George was originally apart of Frank Zappa’s Mothers of Invention before heading out on his own. The “family feel” of Little Feat/Frank Zappa/Robert Palmer and others slots this album into a predetermined category, but it resides there in great company.

Kathy’s career ended when Discreet closed their doors, but outside of this album she recorded with at least two other bands; The Gas Co. and Daughters of Albion. The Gas Co. were a run of the mill 60s garage pop group, though the tunes were decent. “Blow Your Mind” was produced by Jack Nitzsche and released by Mirwood Records in 1965.

Later, before going solo, Kathy would team up with Greg Dempsey to form Daughters of Albion. Daughters of Albion leaned more on the psychedelic side of things and would be as far out there as Kathy’s music would reach. This was when she was still going by Kathy Yesse. DoA released just one self titled album, led by the single “Well Wired”. The single fell flat.

Spotify has Kathy’s solo album available for streaming, check it out below.

Thanks for reading!